Niagara Power Project FERC No. 2216

 

RECREATIONAL FACILITY USE AND CAPACITY INVESTIGATION

 

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Prepared for: New York Power Authority 

Prepared by: Kleinschmidt Associates

 

August 2005

 

___________________________________________________

 

Copyright © 2005 New York Power Authority

 

PREFACE

This report summarizes results from a Recreational Facility Use and Capacity Investigation conducted for the Niagara Power Project (FERC No. 2216).  The report was developed by Kleinschmidt Associates based on recreation data collected from April 2002 through March 2003.  This work was conducted in accordance with a study plan developed in March 2002 in cooperation with the Niagara Project Relicensing Team (which consists of technical and relicensing staff from the New York Power Authority; URS Corporation; Gomez and Sullivan Engineers, P.C.; and E/PRO Engineering and Environmental Consulting, LLC.), and discussions with the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.  The information presented in this report provides an estimate of recreational use at the Niagara Power Project and adjacent recreation facilities.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Twenty-nine recreation sites in the vicinity of the Niagara Power Project were investigated for information on recreational use and capacity.  The investigation included sites located both within and outside the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Project boundary.  Information collected during the investigation was used to document existing conditions.

The investigation included a combination of secondary and primary data collection techniques.  Secondary data on recreational use and capacity was compiled for sites managed by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (NYSOPRHP), as well as several municipal facilities.  Primary field data were collected for sites where there was little or no existing information on recreational use.  Primary data collection relied on roving instantaneous counts supplemented with occasional longer-duration user observations at 19 recreation sites.  The investigation extended from April 2002 through March 2003.  The investigation was closely coordinated with creel survey work being conducted by the New York Power Authority (NYPA) along the lower Niagara River.

Results from the Recreational Facility Use and Capacity Investigation indicate that, on an annual basis, the recreational facilities included in the investigation accommodate approximately 8.8 million recreation days.  The majority of this use (7.6 million recreation days) is associated with Niagara Falls and the Niagara Reservation State Park.  Other heavily used facilities include Earl W. Brydges Artpark State Park, Reservoir State Park, Beaver Island State Park, as well as Niawanda, and Isle View Parks.  Use within the FERC project boundary accounts for a relatively small percentage (less than 1 percent) of the estimated annual study area use. 

Most of the recreational activity in the study area occurs during the summer months.  Approximately 80 percent of the observed activity, based on primary data collection, involved shoreline use, while the remaining 20 percent involved boating activity.  Of all shoreline recreation observed during the survey, the predominant activities were angling (33 percent), sightseeing (27 percent), and trail use (20 percent).  Shoreline and boating activities varied, depending on the site and the time of year. 

Overall, sites are not being used at or above capacity, with the exception of a few particularly popular sites, which were observed at or above 100 percent capacity during certain times of the year.  Capacity issues (in terms of parking) were observed at three sites, one along the Upper River and two along the Lower River.  Sites where use was frequently observed to be in excess of 100 percent of existing capacity were Ontario Street, Lewiston Landing, and Fort Niagara Boat Launch.  All three of these sites offer boat access to the river and received heavy boating use, particularly during the summer months.  Youngstown Boat Launch also exhibited high utilization as a percent of existing capacity (frequently in excess of 90 percent).  This site did not necessarily receive heavy recreation pressure, but it is a small site with very limited existing parking (thus capacity is easily exceeded).  Use at the remaining sites was well below capacity.

Most of the heavy-use sites are located outside the Project boundary.  Sites within the Project (Upper Trail, Upper River Observation Area, Lewiston Reservoir, Robert Moses Parkway and Robert Moses Fishing Pier) generally received light recreation pressure.  Average August weekend use at these sites was generally less than 5 vehicles at one time.  None of the sites within the Project boundary experience use approaching or in excess of capacity.

ABBREVIATIONS

Agencies

FERC               Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

NYSOPRHP     New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation

NYSDEC          New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Regulatory

ADA                Americans with Disabilities Act

NYPA              New York Power Authority

1.0     INTRODUCTION

The New York Power Authority (NYPA) is engaged in the relicensing of the Niagara Power Project in Lewiston, Niagara County, New York.  The present operating license for the plant expires in August 2007.  As part of its preparation for the relicensing of the Niagara Project, NYPA is developing background information related to the ecological, engineering, recreational, cultural, and socioeconomic aspects of the Project.  The Recreational Facility Use and Capacity Investigation described in this report was conducted to obtain data on existing conditions. 

Kleinschmidt Associates (Kleinschmidt) was hired to collect data on recreation from April 2002 to March 2003.  NYPA also commissioned a creel survey of anglers in the lower Niagara River and the Lewiston Reservoir, beginning in April 2002.  The Recreational Facility Use and Capacity Investigation, as described herein, was conducted in close coordination with the creel survey and was specifically designed to utilize results from that survey.

1.1         Study Objectives

The objectives of the Recreational Facility Use and Capacity Investigation were to determine:

·        current public usage of recreational facilities at the Niagara Power Project and in its vicinity

·        use capacity of each of these facilities

·        percent of capacity that is currently being used by the public at each of the selected facilities

1.2         Study Area

The study area for the Recreational Facility Use and Capacity Investigation extended from the Peace Bridge northward to the mouth of the Niagara River at Lake Ontario (See Map 1.2-1).  The study area contains three relatively distinct geographical areas, each offering different recreation opportunities: the Upper River Area (upstream of Niagara Falls); the Niagara Falls and Niagara Gorge Area; and the Lower River Area (downstream of the Gorge Area).  Recreation facilities located in the study area, and included in the Recreational Facility Use and Capacity Investigation, are listed on Table 1.2-1.  These facilities include state parks managed and operated by the New York State Office of Parks Recreation and Historic Preservation (NYSOPRHP), facilities operated by various local municipalities, and facilities built and operated by NYPA, as shown on Table 1.2-1.  Eleven of the twenty-nine recreation facilities in the study area (including the pedestrian portion of the Robert Moses Parkway) are contained, either wholly or in part, within the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) project boundary for the Niagara Power Project (shown as “In-Project” on Table 1.2-1).   

Table 1.2-1

Facilities Included in the Investigation

Site

State Park

Municipal Park

NYPA

In-Project

Upper River Area

 

 

 

 

Ontario Street Boat Launch

 

X

 

 

Sheridan Drive Boat Launch

 

X

 

 

Isle View Park

 

X

 

 

Niawanda Park

 

X

 

 

Buckhorn State Park

X

 

 

 

Beaver Island State Park

X

 

 

 

Big Six Mile Creek Marina

X

 

 

 

Gratwick Park

 

X

 

 

Griffon Park Boat Launch

 

X

 

 

Upper River Trail

 

X

 

X

Upper River Observation Site

 

 

X

X

Hyde Park Golf Course

 

X

 

X

Niagara Falls and Gorge Area

 

 

 

 

Niagara Reservation State Park

X

 

 

 

Discovery Center Museum

X

 

 

X

Great Gorge RR Trail

X

 

 

X

Whirlpool State Park

X

 

 

 

Devil's Hole State Park

X

 

 

 

Robert Moses Parkway

 

 

 

   X *

Robert Moses Fishing Pier

 

 

X

X

Niagara Project Visitor Center

 

 

X

X

Lewiston Reservoir Fishing Access

 

 

X

X

Reservoir State Park

X

 

 

X

 

Table 1.2-1 (CONT.)

Facilities Included in the Investigation

Site

State Park

Municipal Park

NYPA

In-Project

Lower River Area

 

 

 

 

Lewiston Landing

 

X

 

 

Lewiston Branch Gorge Trail

X

 

 

X

Earl W. Brydges Artpark

X

 

 

 

Joseph Davis State Park Pier

X

 

 

 

Youngstown Boat Launch

 

X

 

 

Constitution Park

 

X

 

 

Fort Niagara Boat Launch

X

 

 

 

* A portion of the Robert Moses Parkway is located within the project boundary

Map 1.2-1

Study Area

[NIP – General Location Maps]

2.0     METHODS

The Recreational Facility Use and Capacity Investigation included a combination of primary and secondary data collection techniques.  Several of the recreation facilities in the study area are managed by NYSOPRHP.  Several others are managed by NYPA and various municipal organizations.  NYSOPRHP collects and maintains records on recreational use for all its facilities.  Some of these records are based on fee receipts.  Others are based on estimates developed by NYSOPRHP staff.  Kleinschmidt coordinated with NYSOPRHP and various municipal agencies to identify and obtain available information regarding recreational use.  For recreation facilities with little or no existing data on recreational use, a field survey was designed and conducted to develop estimates of use. 

2.1         Field Data Collection

The recreation field survey utilized a roving survey technique in which field personnel visited each sample site multiple times a day on a set of pre-scheduled sample dates at 19 recreation sites.  Collected data consisted of instantaneous vehicle counts as an indication of total daily use, supplemented by occasional longer-duration observations to collect data on activities, people per car, and length of stay.  Sample data sheets are included in Appendix A.  A stratified random sampling technique that considered season, time of day, and type of day (weekday, weekend, and holiday) was used.  Holidays are also referred to as “peak weekends” throughout this report and include the holiday itself, such as the Fourth of July, and the associated weekend.

Recreation facilities in the study area were sampled on a minimum of five weekdays and five weekend days per month, including major holiday weekends (Memorial Day, Fourth of July, and Labor Day) during the summer season.  Several sites on the lower Niagara River were sampled more frequently in association with the creel survey.  A schedule showing the dates sampled is included in Appendix A.  The investigation extended from April 2002 through March 2003.  The investigation was closely coordinated with planned creel survey work being conducted by NYPA along the lower Niagara River.  A total of 12,877 individuals were observed during the course of the sampling.

2.2         Data Analysis

Instantaneous vehicle count data for all sampled sites was compiled and used to develop seasonal and annual use estimates for each site.  Standard expansion techniques were used to extrapolate instantaneous vehicle counts into average daily use estimates by season and day type for summation and generation of monthly use estimates by site.  For the purposes of this study, recreation use is measured in “recreation days” as defined by FERC.  FERC defines a recreation day as each visit by a person to a development for recreational purposes during any portion of a 24-hour period.  These use estimates were combined with existing use estimates for non-sampled sites to develop seasonal and annual estimates for the entire study area.  For the purposes of this study, use estimates for non-sampled sites are assumed to also be represented in “recreation days.”  Instantaneous vehicle count data was also used in facility capacity estimates and to derive estimates of the percentage of boating activity at sites with boat launching facilities.  Data collected during longer duration monitoring was used to develop shoreline activity profiles of recreation users for each site.

2.3         Recreation Use Estimates

Recreation use estimates were developed using a combination of existing use information and on-site survey data.  Instantaneous count data for all sampled sites were compiled and used to develop seasonal and annual use estimates for each site.  After collecting the data, recreation days were estimated following the method outlined in Angler Survey Methods and Their Applications in Fisheries Management (Pollock et al. 1994).  Instantaneous vehicle counts were used to obtain an estimation of recreation days each site.  The average vehicle count is multiplied by the length of the recreation day, which is 13 hours from April through September, and 8.5 hours the rest of the year.  This provides an estimate of recreator hours.  Recreator hours are converted to recreation days by dividing by the average length of a recreation visit, estimated to be 2 hours.  Recreation days were extrapolated into use estimates by month and day type and summed to generate seasonal use estimates by site.  These use estimates were combined with existing use estimates obtained from state and local park managers for non-sampled sites to develop seasonal and annual estimates for the entire study area. 

2.4         Recreational Activities

Information on the types of recreational activities engaged in at each facility was developed based on a combination of instantaneous count data and periodic on-site observations.  Instantaneous counts of vehicles and vehicles with boat trailers were used to estimate the percent of boating activity associated with those sites offering boat launches.  Observation data were used to develop percentage estimates for various shoreline activities, such as shore angling, walking, and bird watching.  Activity distributions were developed for each site as well as for the entire study area.  The distribution of boating activities over the season was also evaluated.

2.5         Capacity Estimates

For the purpose of the Recreational Facility Use and Capacity Investigation, parking capacity was used as the primary indicator of site capacity, and the percentage of parking space utilized at any given time was used as the measure of capacity utilization.  Table 2.5-1 shows available parking at each site.  While other features of a recreation site, such as restrooms or picnic tables, also have capacity limits, the actual capacity and capacity utilization of these features can be difficult to measure.  Parking capacity and the availability of parking at a given point in time is relatively easy to measure and generally serves as a good indicator of overall site capacity and capacity utilization.  Parking is often designed to fit the size of a given site, and information regarding capacity is either available through existing sources or easily collected.  When the parking area is full or overflowing, other features of the site are generally also being used at or above their design capacity.  Parking is also often one of the more difficult features of a recreation site to expand, depending on the characteristics of the site.  Capacity use estimates for non-survey sites were developed based on input provided by the operators of those sites, primarily NYSOPRHP.

Table 2.5-1

Available Parking at Each Surveyed Site

Site

Number of Parking Spaces

Upper River Area

 

Ontario Street Boat Launch

30

Sheridan Drive Boat Launch

50

Isle View Park

202

Niawanda Park

191

Beaver Island State Park

Multiple Parking Lots

Gratwick Park

134

Griffon Park Boat Launch

50

Upper River Trail

10

Upper River Observation Site

40

Niagara Falls and Gorge Area

 

Whirlpool State Park

150

Devil’s Hole State Park

42

Robert Moses Fishing Pier

20

Lewiston Reservoir Fishing Access

35

Lower River Area

 

Lewiston Landing

20

Lewiston Branch Gorge Trail

15

Joseph Davis State Park Pier

25

Youngstown Boat Launch

14

Constitution Park

2

Fort Niagara Boat Launch

43

 

3.0     RESULTS

Results of the Recreational Facility Use and Capacity Investigation indicate that the recreation sites located within the study area support approximately 8.8 million recreation days annually.  The  majority of this use (7.6 million recreation days) is associated with Niagara Falls and the Niagara Reservation State Park.  Other heavily used facilities include Beaver Island State Park, Earl W. Brydges Artpark, Reservoir State Park, Niawanda Park, and Isle View Park.  Use within the FERC project boundary accounts for a relatively small percentage (less than 1 percent) of the estimated annual study area use.  Overall, recreational use is within the existing facility design capacities, with the exception of a few particularly popular sites or particularly small sites, which were observed supporting use at or above 100 percent capacity on average during certain months of the year.  Most of the recreational activity in the study area occurs during the summer months. 

Approximately 80 percent of the recreational activity observed during the field survey consisted of shoreline uses, while the remaining 20 percent involved boating activity.  The predominant shore activities observed during the survey were angling (33 percent), sightseeing (27 percent), and trail use (20 percent). 

The Upper and Lower River offer somewhat different recreational settings and opportunities.  Most sites along the Upper River offer highly developed facilities and support heavy levels of use.  Almost all these sites offer boat access to the river and experience heavy boat traffic, particularly in the late summer.  Sites in the Niagara Falls and Gorge Area are located well above the river in elevation.  They are designed primarily to provide scenic vistas, and offer only foot-trail access to the water.  Most of the sites along the Lower River are smaller and less highly developed compared to the Upper River sites.  Only a few sites along the Lower River offer boat access and these sites are generally out of the way and relatively small in scale.  With the exception of one or two sites, recreational pressure on the Lower River appears to be relatively light.

Capacity issues (in terms of parking) were observed at three sites, one along the Upper River and two along the Lower River.  Sites where use was frequently observed to be in excess of 100 percent of existing capacity were Ontario Street Boat Launch, Lewiston Landing, and Fort Niagara Boat Launch.  All three of these sites offer boat access to the river and received heavy boating use, particularly during the summer months.  Youngstown Boat Launch also exhibited high utilization as a percent of existing capacity (frequently in excess of 90 percent).  This site did not necessarily receive heavy recreation pressure, but it is a small site with very limited existing parking (thus capacity is easily exceeded).  Constitution Park also exhibited high utilization as a percent of existing capacity, however, like Youngstown Boat Launch, the parking at this site is very limited contributing to high capacity estimates.  Use at the remaining sites was well below capacity.

Most of the heavy-use sites are located outside the Project boundary.  Sites surveyed within the Project (Upper River Trail, Upper River Observation Site, Lewiston Reservoir Fishing Access, Robert Moses Parkway (pedestrian section), and Robert Moses Fishing Pier) generally received light recreation pressure. 

The following sections provide more detail regarding recreational use estimates, recreational activities and capacity utilization.  Specific details for each of the surveyed sites are provided at the end of this section.

3.1         Recreation Use Estimates

Existing annual use estimates were obtained from NYSOPRHP and NYPA for five of the state parks in the study area (Buckhorn, Big Six Mile Creek Marina, Niagara Reservation, Reservoir State Park, and Artpark) and the NYPA Visitor Center.  Existing annual-use estimates were also obtained from the City of Niagara Falls for the Hyde Park Golf Course.  Use estimates for the remaining facilities in the study area were calculated based on data collected during the recreation field survey.  This included six facilities located within the FERC project boundary and fourteen located outside the project boundary.  Two sites within the FERC Project boundary were closed in 2002 for renovation, namely, Discovery Museum and Great Gorge Railroad Trail.  Use of the pedestrian section of the Robert Moses Parkway is included within the estimates for Devil's Hole and Whirlpool State Parks, which serve as the primary staging areas for this trail.  Table 3.1-1 displays recreation day estimates for all the facilities included in the study, including estimates of total weekday use, weekend use, peak weekend use, and annual use where available.  All numbers presented in Table 3.1-1 are for the period April 1, 2002 to March 30, 2003, and represent estimates of total recreation days.  Peak weekend use refers to holidays and their associated weekend, specifically Memorial Day, Fourth of July, and Labor Day weekends.

The estimated total number of recreation days for all the sites included in this report was 8,827,000, for the period April 2002 through March 2003, including Project and non-project sites.  Project sites (those located within the FERC project boundary, either wholly or in part) accounted for 263,400 visitors, or less than 1 percent of the total annual use estimate.  Non-project sites accounted for 8,563,600 recreation days, the majority of which (7,585,500) was associated with Niagara Reservation State Park.  Most of the use occurs during the summer months (June-September).  For sites for which use was delineated by day type, overall average weekday use was approximately 24 percent lower than overall average weekend use. Relatively high levels of recreational use were observed along the Upper River (upstream of Niagara Falls).  Use was particularly heavy during the late summer season (July through September), when boating activity increased significantly at many of the sites.  Average weekend counts of 40 or more vehicles at one time were common at many sites.

Levels of recreational use along the Lower River were generally less than those observed along the Upper River.  Two sites, Lewiston Landing and the Fort Niagara Boat Launch, received relatively heavy use, including heavy use in April.  Overall, use of the Lower River sites was highest in July and August.  Several sites along the Lower River, including the Robert Moses Fishing Pier, Lewiston Reservoir, Lewiston Branch Gorge Trail, Joseph Davis Fishing Pier, and Youngstown Boat Launch, exhibited a fairly consistent level of low use throughout the survey period.

Figure 3.1-1 shows the total number of recreation days at all surveyed sites throughout the year.  Use was relatively even during April and May, with a significant increase in use during July, August, and September.  After September, use dropped from approximately 118,900 recreation days in September to approximately 27,700 recreation days in October and less than 14,500 recreation days for the remainder of the fall and winter months.  Figure 3.1-1 does not include data for sites that were not surveyed, such as the Niagara Reservation, but the general pattern of use is assumed to be the same.

3.2         Recreational Activities

The recreation facilities within the study area support a variety of shoreline activities.  Several facilities also provide boat launching opportunities and thus support boating.  Overall, approximately 80 percent of the observed use was shoreline use while 20 percent involved boating.  The predominant shore activities observed during the survey were angling (33 percent), sightseeing (27 percent), and trail use (20 percent).  Shoreline activities varied depending on the site and the time of year.  Similarly, boating activity was higher at certain sites and during certain times of the year.

The distribution of shoreline activities for each of the survey sites is shown on Table 3.2-1.  Shoreline activities were observed during on-site monitoring and are reported in terms of total number of people observed by activity for each surveyed site and by overall percentage distribution of activities engaged in by people observed at each site during on-site monitoring efforts.  Sightseeing accounted for between 10 and 30 percent of observed shoreline use at surveyed sites, with over 50 percent of use attributed to sightseeing at Whirlpool State Park and Devil’s Hole State Park.  Boating activity is reported as a percentage of total estimated use, calculated as the ratio of vehicles with boat trailers to total vehicles recorded during instantaneous vehicle counts, and is shown on Table 3.2-2 for those sites with boat launching facilities.  For these sites, boating activity ranged from a low of 6 percent of total estimated use at Youngstown Boat Launch to 44 percent of total estimated use at Fort Niagara Boat Launch.

The predominant shoreline activities observed during on-site monitoring along the Upper River were sightseeing and trail use (walking, running, biking).  Trail use was as high as approximately 60 percent of the observed use at Isle View Park.  Sightseeing generally accounted for between 10 and 20 percent of observed use, depending on the site, but was as high as approximately 40 percent at the Upper River Observation Site and Gratwick Park.  Boating activity for the entire season generally ranged between 20 and 30 percent of total use at sites with boat access, with lower percentages at other sites.  Based on trailer counts, boat use at several sites accounted for between 50 and 80 percent of total use in May through September.  It was common to see 20 or more boat trailers at a given site at any one time, with observations as high as 72 boat trailers at one time at one site.

The predominant shoreline activities observed during on-site monitoring at Lower River sites were sightseeing and trail use (walking, running, biking).  Trail use ranged from approximately 20 to 30 percent of observed use at many of the sites, including Whirlpool State Park, Devil's Hole State Park, Lewiston Reservoir, and the Lewiston Branch Gorge Trail.  Trail use accounted for nearly all observed use at Robert Moses Parkway.  Boating activities were high at two of the three boat launches located along the Lower River (Lewiston Landing and Fort Niagara Boat Launch).  Based on trailer count ratios, boating activity at the Fort Niagara and Youngstown Boat Launches was, in certain months, as high as 100 percent of observed use.  It was common to see 20 or more boat trailers at the Fort Niagara site at any one time, with observations as high as 72 at one time. 

Figures 3.2-1 and 3.2-2 display the observed seasonal distribution of use for boat launching facilities on the Upper and Lower River, respectively.  In addition to showing the seasonal pattern in total estimated use for these facilities, Figures 3.2-1 and 3.2-2 also display the relative split between boating and shoreline use at these sites along the Upper and Lower River by month, estimated through trailer to total vehicle ratios by site.  The bottom portion of each bar in the figures represents boating activity and the top portion represents shoreline activity.  These data indicate an increase in boating activity both on the Upper and Lower River from June through September, with the highest levels of boating (as well as total use) occurring in August for the Upper River sites and September for the Lower River sites.  By contrast, these data indicate no boating activity in the Upper River during the late fall and winter, but some level of boating activity during this time in the Lower River.  Similarly, in March, there appears to be boating activity in the Lower River, but almost none in the Upper River.  These data indicate relatively even levels of shoreline use between June and September, with a spike in shoreline use in April.  Use declines dramatically after September in all cases. 

3.3         Facility Capacity and Utilization

Facility utilization was evaluated at each site.  Most of the facilities are being used at levels well below their design capacity.  However, at five sites (Ontario Street Boat Launch, Lewiston Landing, Youngstown Boat Launch, Constitution Park, and Fort Niagara), average monthly utilization exceeded 100 percent, particularly during the summer months.  Average utilization estimates as a percentage of existing capacity are shown for each survey site for weekdays, weekends, and peak weekends on Table 3.3-1.

Many of the Upper River sites have substantial existing recreation facility infrastructure with ample parking.  As a result, capacity (in terms of parking) was not observed to be a problem at most of the Upper River sites.  The one exception was Ontario Street Boat Launch, where use levels were frequently observed in excess of existing capacity.

Capacity issues were observed at four sites on the Lower River, namely, Lewiston Landing, Youngstown Boat Launch, Constitution Park, and Fort Niagara Boat Launch.  All these sites are relatively small, and two of them (Lewiston Landing and Fort Niagara Boat Launch) receive considerable recreation pressure.  Use in excess of 100 percent capacity was observed frequently at these sites.  Use at the Lewiston Landing exceeded the site’s existing parking capacity approximately a third of the time.

The maximum number of cars found at each site was generally in the summer: July, August, and September.  The site with the highest number of cars was Niawanda, with a maximum reaching 287 vehicles on August 11, 2002.  Constitution Park at its peak (July 24, 2002) had only 16 cars.  Maximum observations for each survey site are shown in Table 3.3-2.

3.4         Site Observations

The following presents site-specific information for each of the sites surveyed during the Recreational Facility Use and Capacity Investigation.

3.4.1        Ontario Street Boat Launch

·                  High use during spring and summer seasons

·                  Highest use in summer months (June-September)

·                  Average weekday and weekend day approximately the same use.

·                  Average peak weekend use nearly three times average weekday use

·                  Highest observed use was 85 vehicles on an August weekday.

·                  Average weekday use reached a high of 34 vehicles in August.

·                  Average weekend day use reached a high of 40 vehicles in August.

·                  A total of 178 users were observed over 10 one-hour observation periods (average of approximately 18 people per hour).

·                  Approximately 90 percent of overall estimated use was attributable to shoreline activity, with slightly more than 10 percent attributable to boating activity.  However, at times, particularly during August and September, boating activity accounted for as much as approximately 40 percent of total estimated site use (see Table 3.4-1).

·                  The predominant shoreline activities observed at the site during on-site monitoring were sightseeing (37 percent) and parking (31 percent).

·                  A significant increase in boating was observed in August and September (two to three-fold on average over the April-June period).

·                  Use frequently exceeds existing parking capacity (approximately 30 vehicles at one time).  The site was at or above 100 percent of its capacity approximately 23 percent of the time.

3.4.2        Sheridan Drive Boat Launch

·                  Use dropped off significantly after September.

·                  Low early season use with significant increase in August and September (generally associated with boating activity).

·                  Average weekend use was about twice average weekday use.

·                  Average weekday use had a high of 25 vehicles in August.

·                  Average weekend day use 41 vehicles.

·                  Highest observed use (72 vehicles at one time) occurred on August 3, 2002.  Use was also high on Labor Day (68 vehicles at one time).

·                  A total of 69 users were observed over nine one-hour observation periods (average of approximately 8 people per hour).

·                  On average, approximately 70 percent of estimated use was shoreline use, while approximately 30 percent was associated with boating activity.

·                  At times, particularly during the summer months (June through September), as much as 86 percent of the site use was associated with boating activity (see Table 3.4-2).

·                  Of the observed shoreline uses at this site, the predominant shoreline uses observed at the site consisted of angling (46 percent), bird watching (21 percent), and sightseeing (15 percent).

·                  Consistent early evening use, July through September.

·                  Many trailers, particularly July through September (as many as 57 at one time).

·                  Capacity of the site typically remained under 100 percent.

3.4.3        Isle View Park

·                  Relatively high level of use all spring/summer season, with highest levels of use in July through September.

·                  Higher average peak weekend use than weekday or weekend use. 

·                  Average weekday use was as high as 50 vehicles in August.

·                  Average weekend day use was as high as 104 vehicles in August.

·                  Highest observed use was 161 vehicles at one time on August 11, 2002. 

·                  Highest boating use month on average was September  (29 percent).

·                  A total of 156 users were observed over eight one-hour observation periods (average of approximately 20 people per hour).

·                  Shoreline activities accounted for over 90 percent of the estimated use, with boating accounting for less than 10 percent.

·                  Of the shoreline use observed during monitoring efforts, the predominant activities were trail use, including walking (27 percent), running (14 percent), and biking (16 percent).  Sightseeing and parking activities accounted for another 12 percent and 8 percent, respectively.

·                  Boating activity was common from May to September, with an average of 11 to 29 percent of the vehicles having trailers (see Table 3.4-3).

·                  The annual average of vehicles with boat trailers was 9 percent.

·                  Despite high use, capacity was not an issue due to the large number of existing parking spaces (202)

·                  The highest use observed (August 11, 2002) was approximately 80 percent of capacity.

3.4.4        Niawanda Park

·                  Very similar use patterns to Isle View Park.

·                  High use all spring/summer season long with significant increased use in late summer.

·                  The highest observed number of vehicles at one time was 287, on August 11, 2002.

·                  Average weekend use heavier than weekday use (generally by a factor of 2) while average peak weekend use was heavier than average weekday us by an overall factor of 4.

·                  Highest-use month on average was August, with average weekday use as high as 70 vehicles and average weekend day use as high as 124 vehicles.

·                  A total of 69 users were observed over 10 one-hour observation periods (average of approximately 7 people per hour).

·                  Shoreline activities accounted for 90 percent of estimated use, with boating accounting for 10 percent.

·                  The predominant shoreline activities observed during on-site monitoring of this site were running (31 percent), parking (25 percent), and picnicking (9 percent).

·                  Boating activity was relatively heavy in June through September, with 11 percent to 34 percent of observed vehicles having trailers (see Table 3.4-4).

·                  The annual average of vehicles with boat trailers was 10 percent.

·                  Despite high levels of use, parking capacity was typically not a problem due to the number of existing spaces (191).  Most of the time, site use was at 50 percent of capacity or less.  Several August and September observations were between 60 percent and 80 percent of capacity.

3.4.5        Gratwick Park

·                  Very consistent, relatively low level of use from April through July, with significant increase in use August and September (generally associated with boating activity).

·                  The highest observed use was 72 vehicles at one time, on September 15, 2002.

·                  On average, August was the highest-use month, with an average weekday use high of 21 vehicles.  Average weekend day use had a high of 42 vehicles in September.

·                  A total of 126 users were observed over 11 one-hour observation periods (average of approximately 11 people per hour).

·                  Shoreline activities accounted for approximately 80 percent of total estimated use, with boating accounting for slightly less than 20 percent.

·                  During on-site monitoring, the predominant shoreline activities observed were sightseeing (39 percent), trail use, with jogging and biking accounting for 8 percent and 11 percent, respectively, and parking (11 percent).

·                  Considerable increase in boating activity from May through September, with as many as 44 trailers observed at one time (August 31, 2002).  Boating activity was much higher on weekend days than on weekdays.

·                  The annual average of vehicles with boat trailers was 17 percent, but boating activity accounted for as much as 49 percent of site use in September (see Table 3.4-5).

·                  Parking capacity was generally not a problem. The highest observed use was 54 percent of capacity, on September 15, 2002. 

3.4.6        Griffon Park Boat Launch

·                  Relatively low level of use from April through July, with an increase in use July through September (generally associated with boating activity).  Very similar level and pattern of use as that observed at Gratwick.

·                  The highest count observed was 62 vehicles at one time, on August 11, 2002.

·                  Heaviest use in August and September with an average weekday use high of 17 vehicles and an average weekend day use high of 32 vehicles in August.

·                  A total of 53 users were observed over 10 one-hour observation periods (average of approximately 5 people per hour).

·                  On average, boating activity accounted for approximately 30 percent of the total estimated use, while shoreline activity accounted for the remaining 70 percent.

·                  The predominant shoreline activities observed during on-site monitoring were angling (24 percent), parking (36 percent), sightseeing (21 percent), and walking (12 percent).

·                  Large number of trailers observed on site, particularly from July through September.  Between 59 percent and 83 percent of the vehicles observed on site in June, July, August, and September had trailers (see Table 3.4-6).  Approximately 20 boat trailers observed on average on August weekends (highest observation was 43 trailers at one time, on September 15, 2002).

·                  The annual average of vehicles with boat trailers was approximately 30 percent.

·                  Assuming, conservatively, a parking capacity of 50 vehicles, capacity was generally not an issue at the site.  Observations between 50 percent and 80 percent of capacity were not uncommon in May through September. 

3.4.7        Upper River Trail

·                  Very light use all season.

·                  Very consistent from month to month and day to day.

·                  Use ranged from 0 to a high of 21 vehicles (on Memorial Day) at any one time.

·                  No marked increase in summer activity over early season use.

·                  Average weekday and weekend day use reached high of only approximately 3 vehicles in August.

·                  A total of 42 people were observed over nine one-hour periods (average of 5 people per hour).

·                  Shoreline activities accounted for all recreation use at this site with the predominant shoreline activities observed were angling (26 percent), parking (31 percent), and biking (11 percent).

·                  Site capacity was not a problem.

·                  See Table 3.4-7 for more information.

3.4.8        Upper River Observation Site

·                  Very low use (0-2 vehicles at one time on average).  This site reached an average weekday use high of only 7 vehicles in April.

·                  Consistent all season and regardless of day type.

·                  A total of 72 people were observed over 15 one-hour periods (average of approximately 5 people per hour).

·                  During on-site monitoring, the predominant shoreline activities observed were sightseeing (41 percent) and running (18 percent).  Shoreline activities accounted for all of the estimated use at this site.

·                  Site capacity was not a problem.

·                  See Table 3.4-8 for more information

3.4.9        Robert Moses Parkway

·                  Parkway use was estimated through a combination of vehicle counts at major parking lots serving the parkway (namely Whirlpool and Devil's Hole) and two days of on-site observations (August 7 and September 2, 2002). Based on on-site observations approximately 15 percent of the observed vehicles at Whirlpool and Devil's Hole (on average) were associated with parkway use. 

·                  A total of 13 people were observed using the parkway over ten one-hour periods (average of approximately 1 person per hour).

·                  As there is no water access at this site, shoreline activities account for the total estimated use at this site with the predominant activities observed were biking (85 percent), parking (8 percent), and walking (8 percent).

3.4.10     Whirlpool State Park

·                  Steady use, but variable, depending on day type and time of day. 

·                  Use is relatively constant throughout most of the season, with slightly higher use observed in July.

·                  Average weekday use reached a high of 12 vehicles in July.

·                  Average weekend day use reached a high of 29 vehicles in July.

·                  Highest observed use was on July 4, 2002 (61 vehicles at one time).

·                  A total of 1,422 people were observed over 55 one-hour periods (average of approximately 26 people per hour).

·                  The predominant shoreline activities observed during on-site monitoring were sightseeing (54 percent), picnicking (16 percent), and walking (13 percent).  There are no boat launching facilities at this site.  As such, all estimated use is attributable to shoreline activities.

·                  Assuming an existing parking capacity of 150 vehicles, site capacity was not an issue.  The highest observed use was approximately 40 percent of existing capacity.

·                  See Table 3.4-9 for more information.

3.4.11     Devil's Hole State Park

·                  Use patterns were lower than Whirlpool all season long.

·                  Average weekday use high of 5 vehicles in August and an average weekend day high of 10 vehicles in April.

·                  Highest observed use was 29 vehicles at one time, on May 4, 2002.

·                  Highest observed summer use was 16 vehicles at one time (August 30 and 31, 2002).

·                  A total of 1,228 people were observed over 57 one-hour periods (average of approximately 22 people per hour).

·                  During on-site monitoring at this site, the predominant shoreline activities observed were sightseeing (61 percent) and walking (13 percent) and comprise total estimated use at this site.

·                  Capacity was not a problem.  Assuming, conservatively, a capacity of 42 parking spaces (only one of two available lots) the site rarely experienced usage greater than 14 percent.  The highest observed capacity was 73 percent, which occurred on May 4, 2002.

·                  See Table 3.4-10 for more information.

3.4.12     Robert Moses Fishing Pier

·                  Both the upper parking lot and the tailrace pier (including lower handicapped lot) were monitored.

·                  Predominant shoreline activities noted during on-site monitoring at this site were angling (93 percent) and sightseeing (3 percent) and comprise the activity distribution for total estimated use at this site.

·                  Average weekday use had a high of 9 vehicles, while average weekend day use reached a high of 17 vehicles, both occurring in November.

·                  Highest observed use was on November 9,2002 (98 vehicles at one time in both lots).

·                  A total of 1,358 people were observed over the course of 25 one-hour periods (average of approximately 50 people per hour).

·                  Parking capacity was not an issue with an average observed utilization of approximately 40 percent. 

·                  See Table 3.4-11 for additional information

3.4.13     Lewiston Landing

·                  Highest use in September and October, but April use also high.

·                  The highest average for weekday use was 30 vehicles in October and the highest average for weekend day use was 48 vehicles in April.

·                  Weekend and peak weekend use frequently exceeded 100 percent capacity.

·                  The highest observed use was 102 vehicles at one time, recorded on March 15, 2003.

·                  A total of 2,554 people were observed over 65 one-hour periods (average of approximately 39 people per hour).

·                  Shoreline use accounted for approximately 70 percent of total estimated use, while boating accounted for the remaining 30 percent.  However, depending on the month, boating activity accounted for as much as 39 percent of total estimated use (see Table 3.4-12).

·                   The predominant shoreline activities observed during on-site monitoring were sightseeing (27 percent), walking (17 percent), and angling (26 percent).

·                  The annual average was 29 percent of vehicles with boat trailers.

·                  Relatively heavy boat trailer use was observed all season.  The greatest number of boat trailers was observed in October (40 trailers).

·                  Use of the site exceeded existing capacity several days per month (based on a capacity estimate of 20 vehicles), particularly in March, April, September, and October. 

3.4.14     Lewiston Branch Gorge Trail

·                  Very low levels of use observed.

·                  Average weekday use reached a high of 13 vehicles in November.

·                  Average weekend day use reached a high of 6 vehicles in November.

·                  The highest observed use of 30 vehicles on November 9, 2002.

·                  Use was variable over the course of the year, with an average high of 58 percent capacity.

·                  A total of 911 people were observed over 50 one-hour periods (average of approximately 18 people per hour).

·                  The predominant shoreline activities observed, comprising total estimated use, were angling (58 percent), walking (19 percent), and sightseeing (7 percent).

·                  Parking capacity was not an issue.

·                  See Table 3.4-13 for additional information.

3.4.15     Joseph Davis State Park Pier Lot

·                  Very low use (generally 0-5 vehicles at one time), with a few days of moderate use (15-25 vehicles at one time) occurring on occasional weekend days and holidays.

·                  Higher-use days likely associated with organized picnic events.

·                  The highest observed use occurred on March 16, 2002 (a weekend), when 59 vehicles at one time were observed.  Average weekend use high (11 vehicles) also occurred during March.

·                  A total of 423 people were observed over 29 one-hour periods (average of approximately 15 people per hour).

·                  Shoreline use accounted for all use estimated for this site.  The predominant activities observed were angling (35 percent), picnicking (19 percent), sightseeing (16 percent), and walking (16 percent).

·                  Capacity was generally not an issue.  Days of higher use were in the 60 percent to 100 percent capacity range, but were limited to a few days.  Capacity exceeded 100 percent in only 3 instances.

·                  See Table 3.4.14 for additional information.

3.4.16     Youngstown Boat Launch

·                  Low to moderate levels of use (0-10 vehicles at one time) with occasional days of higher use 15-20 vehicles at one time.

·                  High use observed on May weekends (including Memorial Day weekend), and weekends in July (including Fourth of July weekend) and August.

·                  Average weekday use reached a high of 10 vehicles in September.

·                  Average weekend day use reached a high of 35 vehicles in May.

·                  The highest observed use (52 vehicles at one time) occurred on June 19, 2002.

·                  A total of 861 people were observed over 37 one-hour periods (average of approximately 23 people per hour).

·                  Shoreline use accounted for over 90 percent of total estimated use, with boating making up less than 10 percent.

·                  The predominant activities observed were sightseeing (31 percent), angling (23 percent), and walking (13 percent).

·                  The annual average of vehicles with boat trailers was 6 percent.

·                  Use was observed to be in excess of the existing parking capacity (14 vehicles) 19 out of 186 days (10 percent ).  Use was also observed to be in excess of 80 percent of site capacity on numerous occasions. On a monthly basis, use was below capacity.

·                  See Table 3.4-15 for additional information.

3.4.17     Constitution Park

·                  Very low use (0-3 vehicles at one time) throughout the survey.

·                  Average weekend and weekday use very similar.

·                  Average peak weekend use generally twice that of regular weekend or weekday use.

·                  The maximum number of vehicles observed at Constitution Park at one time was 16.

·                  A total of 363 people were observed over 33 one-hour periods (average of approximately 11 people per hour).

·                  Shoreline activities accounted for all estimated use at this site.  The predominant shoreline activities observed were sightseeing (29 percent) and walking (20 percent).

·                  For the month of July, average capacity was over 100 percent.  During all other months it was below 100 percent.

·                  See Table3.4-16 for additional information.

3.4.18     Fort Niagara Boat Launch

·                  Relatively high levels of use, with heavy boating activity.

·                  Use was heaviest early in the season (April and May) and late in the season (August and September), hitting a peak in August.

·                  Average weekday use reached a high of 26 vehicles in April.

·                  Average weekend day use reached a high of 115 vehicles in May.

·                  The highest observed use (159 vehicles at one time) was on August 3, 2002.

·                  Use highly variable from day to day.

·                  A total of 1,070 people were observed over 58 one-hour periods (average of 18 people per hour).

·                  Boating activities accounted for 44 percent of total estimated use use, with shoreline uses accounting for the remaining 56 percent.  At times, boating use was 60 percent or higher on a monthly average basis (see Table 3.4-17).

·                  During on-site monitoring efforts, the predominant shoreline activities observed were walking (28 percent), angling (25 percent), and sightseeing (18 percent).

·                  Heavy trailer use, particularly in April though October.  More trailers observed at this site on average than any other site surveyed (both Upper and Lower River).

·                  The annual average of vehicles with boat trailers was 44 percent.

·                  Observed use was frequently in excess of existing site capacity (based on a capacity estimate of 38 vehicles, including grass overflow area), especially in August.   Use was commonly 2 to 3 times capacity.

3.4.19     Lewiston Reservoir

·                  Generally light use (0-5 vehicles at one time) with occasional days of higher use.

·                  Highest monthly capacity was in June (33 percent).

·                  Relatively even pressure regardless of day type or month.

·                  A total of 1,264 people were observed over 47 one-hour periods (average of 27 people per hour).

·                  The highest observed use was 73 vehicles at one time, on June 27, 2002.

·                  The predominant activities shoreline activities observed during on-site monitoring were angling (47 percent), walking (21 percent), and sightseeing (9 percent).  Shoreline activities accounted for all estimated use at this site.

·                  No capacity issues were observed.

·                  See Table 3.4-18 for additional information.

3.4.20     Beaver Island State Park

·                  Use was monitored at Beaver Island during April and May.  The park is open during these months, but the entrance gate is not staffed and no fees are collected.  An additional site observation was also made in August 2002.

·                  High levels of use were observed, in fact higher than any other survey site (both Upper and Lower River) during April and May.

·                  Use was typically in excess of 20 vehicles at one time, and frequently over 30 vehicles.

·                  High-use observations were made on May 6 for weekdays and May 4 for weekend days, with 84 and 147 vehicles at one time, respectively.

·                  A total of 71 people were observed over four one-hour periods (average of approximately 18 people per hour).

·                  The predominant activities observed were sightseeing (35 percent), and other activities (53 percent).

·                  Due to the overall size of the park and its significant number of existing parking spaces, capacity was not an issue

 

Table 3.1-1

Use Estimates for the Niagara Project, Including Project and Non-Project Sites (April 2002 - March 2003)

Site

Weekend

Weekday

Peak Weekend

TOTAL

Project Sites

 

 

 

 

Upper River Trail

4,000

1,400

600

6,000

Upper River Observation Site

2,700

500

200

3,400

Hyde Park Golf Course*

N/A

N/A

N/A

27,000

Discovery Center Museum

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Great Gorge RR Trail

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Robert Moses Fishing Pier

12,000

9,400

1,200

22,600

Niagara Project Visitor Center*

N/A

N/A

N/A

85,200

Lewiston Reservoir

9,900

1,900

400

12,200

Lewiston Branch Gorge Trail

5,500

3,300

300

9,100

Reservoir State Park*

N/A

N/A

N/A

97,900

Subtotal Project Sites

 

 

 

263,400

Table 3.1-1 (Cont.)

Use Estimates for the Niagara Project, including PROJECT and non-project sites

 

Site

Weekend

Weekday

Peak Weekend

TOTAL

Non-Project Sites

 

 

 

 

Ontario Street Boat Launch

46,300

21,000

4,900

72,200

Sheriden Drive Boat Launch

22,700

13,300

3,400

39,400

Isle View Park

54,200

36,300

8,700

99,200

Niawanda Park

65,700

40,700

10,200

116,600

Buckhorn State Park*

 

 

 

16,600

Beaver Island State Park*

 

 

 

204,200

Big Six Mile Creek Marina*

 

 

 

36,900

Gratwick Park

19,300

14,600

3,700

37,600

Griffon Park Boat Launch

16,500

10,700

2,700

29,900

Niagara Reservation State Park*

 

 

 

7,585,500

Whirlpool State Park

25,100

16,200

4,800

46,100

Devil's Hole State Park

12,200

9,600

1,900

23,700

Earl W. Brydges ArtPark*

 

 

 

90,400

Lewiston Landing

41,400

25,400

3,800

70,600

Joseph Davis State Park Pier

1,800

3,100

900

5,800

Youngstown Boat Launch

11,600

7,200

1,700

20,500

Constitution Park

1,900

800

200

2,900

Fort Niagara Boat Launch

26,700

32,800

6,000

65,500

Subtotal Non-Project Sites

 

 

 

8,563,600

TOTAL ALL SITES

 

 

 

8,827,000

*Use estimates based on secondary data.  Site not surveyed in 2002.

Table 3.2-1

Observed Shoreline Activities during On-Site Monitoring *

 

Site

Swimming

Angling

Running

Walking

Biking

Picnicking

Bird Watching

Sight Seeing

Parking

"Other"

Total No. of People Observed

Ontario Street Boat Launch

0

15

0

6

0

17

0

61

51

16

166

 

0%

9%

0%

4%

0%

10%

0%

37%

31%

10%

 

Sheridan Drive Boat Launch

0

15

0

0

4

0

7

5

0

2

33

 

0%

46%

0%

0%

12%

0%

21%

15%

0%

6%

 

Isle View Park

0

1

21

40

23

20

0

17

12

12

146

 

0%

1%

14%

27%

16%

14%

0%

12%

8%

8%

 

Niawanda Park

0

2

21

1

0

6

0

10

17

10

67

 

0%

3%

31%

2%

0%

9%

0%

15%

25%

15%

 

Gratwick Park

0

4

7

3

9

7

0

33

9

12

84

 

0%

5%

8%

4%

11%

8%

0%

39%

11%

14%

 

Griffon Park Boat Launch

0

8

0

4

0

0

0

7

12

2

33

 

0%

24%

0%

12%

0%

0%

0%

21%

36%

6%

 

Upper River Trail

0

9

1

0

4

3

3

3

11

1

35

 

0%

26%

3%

0%

11%

9%

9%

9%

31%

3%

 

Upper River Observation Site

0

0

12

3

2

8

0

27

3

11

66

 

0%

0%

18%

5%

3%

12%

0%

41%

5%

17%

 

Robert Moses Parkway

0

0

0

1

11

0

0

0

1

0

13

 

0%

0%

0%

8%

85%

0%

0%

0%

8%

0%

 

Whirlpool State Park

0

77

57

173

19

223

0

742

13

68

1372

 

0%

6%

4%

13%

1%

16%

0%

54%

1%

5%

 

Devil's Hole State Park

0

116

54

159

56

22

0

726

19

40

1192

 

0%

10%

5%

13%

5%

2%

0%

61%

2%

3%

 

Table 3.2-1 (Cont.)

OBSERVED SHORELINE ACTIVITIES DURING ON-SITE MONITORING*

 

Site

Swimming

Angling

Running

Walking

Biking

Picnicking

Bird Watching

Sight Seeing

Parking

"Other"

Total No. of People Observed

Robert Moses Fishing Pier

0

1268

0

10

0

0

0

45

0

34

1357

 

0%

93%

0%

1%

0%

0%

0%

3%

0%

3%

 

Lewiston Landing

18

838

18

554

60

226

7

874

107

483

3185

 

1%

26%

1%

17%

2%

7%

0.2%

27%

3%

15%

 

Lewiston Branch Gorge Trail

0

524

10

173

24

53

1

66

11

36

898

 

0%

58%

1%

19%

3%

6%

0.1%

7%

1%

4%

 

Joseph Davis State Park Pier

0

144

4

64

19

79

2

67

17

15

411

 

0%

35%

1%

16%

4%

19%

0.5%

16%

4%

4%

 

Youngstown Boat Launch

11

173

11

97

46

17

0

238

36

128

757

 

1%

23%

1%

13%

6%

2%

0%

31%

5%

17%

 

Constitution Park

0

29

0

73

24

7

0

105

1

124

363

 

0%

8%

0%

20%

7%

2%

0%

29%

0.3%

34%

 

Fort Niagara Boat Launch

1

214

23

241

34

44

0

155

25

127

864

 

0.1%

25%

3%

28%

4%

5%

0%

18%

3%

15%

 

Lewiston Reservoir Fishing Access

2

583

65

265

25

9

0

117

28

148

1242

 

0.2%

47%

5%

21%

2%

1%

0%

9%

2%

12%

 

Beaver Island State Park

0

3

2

0

0

0

3

26

1

39

74

 

0%

4%

3%

0%

0%

0%

4%

35%

1%

53%

 

Total

32

4023

306

1770

360

741

23

3324

374

1308

12261

 

0.3%

33%

3%

14%

3%

6%

0.2%

27%

3%

11%

 

* The numbers in the table represent observed individuals participating in shoreline recreation activities during on-site monitoring. The primary shoreline recreation activity was recorded for each individual.  Percentages may not sum to 100 due to rounding

 

Table 3.2-2

Percentage of Vehicles Observed with Boat Trailers*

Site

Boating Activity (%)

Upper River

 

Ontario Street Boat Launch

12

Sheridan Drive Boat Launch

33

Isle View Park

9

Niawanda Park

10

Gratwick Park

17

Griffon Park Boat Launch

29

Lower River

 

Lewiston Landing

29

Youngstown Boat Launch

6

Fort Niagara Boat Launch

44

*Based on total number of cars at the site.

 

Table 3.3-1

Average Percent Capacity Use of Existing Parking

Site

No. Parking Spaces

Weekday %

Weekend %

Peak Weekend %

Project Sites

 

 

 

 

Upper River Trail

10

12

10

52

Upper River Observation Area

40

2

1

4

Robert Moses Fishing Pier

20

14

19

25

Lewiston Branch Gorge Trail

15

13

26

16

Lewiston Reservoir

35

15

8

9

Non-Project Sites

 

 

 

 

Ontario Street Boat Launch

30

45

54

123

Sheridan Drive Boat Launch

50

13

20

49

Isle View Park

202

7

13

32

Niawanda Park

191

9

16

41

Gratwick Park

134

4

9

22

Griffon Park Boat Launch

50

9

16

43

Whirlpool State Park

150

3

6

13

Devil's Hole State Park

42

6

11

19

Lewiston Landing

20

77

118

145

Joseph Davis State Park Pier

25

2

12

27

Youngstown Boat Launch

14

28

34

93

Constitution Park

2

36

32

88

Fort Niagara Boat Launch

43

18

55

111

 

Table 3.3-2

Maximum Number of Vehicles Observed at One Time

Site

Date

Number of Vehicles

Upper River Sites

 

 

Ontario Street Boat Launch

August 30, 2002

85

Sheridan Drive Boat Launch

August 3, 2002

72

Isle View Park

August 11, 2002

161

Niawanda Park

August 11, 2002

287

Gratwick Park

September 15, 2002

72

Griffon Park Boat Launch

August 11, 2002

62

Upper River Trail

May 27, 2002

21

Upper River Observation Site

April 17, 2002

39

Niagara Falls and Gorge Area

 

 

Whirlpool State Park

July 4, 2002

61

Devil’s Hole State Park

May 4, 2002

29

Robert Moses Fishing Pier

November 9, 2002

98

Lewiston Reservoir Fishing Access

June 27, 2002

73

Lower River Sites

 

 

Lewiston Landing

March 15, 2003

102

Lewiston Branch Gorge Trail

November 9, 2002

30

Joseph Davis State Park Pier

March 16, 2003

59

Youngstown Boat Launch

June 19, 2002

52

Constitution Park

July 24, 2002

16

Fort Niagara Boat Launch

August 3, 2002

159

 

Table 3.4-1

Ontario Street Boat Launch – Site Observations

Day/Month

Percent Capacity (%)

Boating Activity* (%)

Weekday

45

 

Weekend

54

 

Peak Weekend

123

 

April 2002

56

5

May 2002

78

16

June 2002

111

25

July 2002

94

17

August 2002

125

33

September 2002

118

38

October 2002

36

7

November 2002

7

0

December 2002

8

0

January 2003

2

0

February 2003

8

0

March 2003

13

0

Overall

54

12

*Based on observed vehicles with boat trailers relative to the total number of observed vehicles

 

Table 3.4-2

Sheridan Drive Boat Launch– Site Observations

Day/Month

Percent Capacity (%)

Boating Activity* (%)

Weekday

13

 

Weekend

20

 

Peak Weekend

49

 

April 2002

15

27

May 2002

15

48

June 2002

25

86

July 2002

32

49

August 2002

63

61

September 2002

61

79

October 2002

4

22

November 2002

1

20

December 2002

1

0

January 2003

0

0

February 2003

0

0

March 2003

0

0

Overall

18

33

* Based on observed vehicles with boat trailers relative to the total number of observed vehicles

 

Table 3.4-3

Isle View Park – Site Observations

Day/Month

Percent Capacity (%)

Boating Activity* (%)

Weekday

7

 

Weekend

13

 

Peak Weekend

32

 

April 2002

10

5

May 2002

16

11

June 2002

18

25

July 2002

23

15

August 2002

36

15

September 2002

28

29

October 2002

4

6

November 2002

1

0

December 2002

0

0

January 2003

0

0

February 2003

0

0

March 2003

2

0

Overall

11

9

* Based on observed vehicles with boat trailers relative to the total number of observed vehicles

 

Table 3.4-4

Niawanda Park – Site Observations

Day/Month

Percent Capacity (%)

Boating Activity* (%)

Weekday

9

 

Weekend

16

 

Peak Weekend

41

 

April 2002

12

5

May 2002

19

14

June 2002

20

34

July 2002

28

11

August 2002

50

22

September 2002

36

28

October 2002

4

4

November 2002

0

0

December 2002

0

0